COW LIABILITY: Kye Cooper’s crumpled vehicle after a collison with a cow on Maryborough Biggenden Rd.
COW LIABILITY: Kye Cooper’s crumpled vehicle after a collison with a cow on Maryborough Biggenden Rd.

Cows on the road? What you need to know

WARNING: GRAPHIC IMAGE

COMING across wild animals and stock on the road is part of country life, but the issue of legality and liability is a grey area for most people.

During a recent accident out of Biggenden, meatworkers employee Kye Cooper totalled his $40,000 Mazda Ute after colliding with a stray cow.

The focal point of Mr Cooper's frustration was the responsibility for the stray animal, due to the absence of a brand mark.

Detective Sergeant and officer-in-charge of the Stock and Rural Crime Squad in Roma, Scott Jackson, said in terms of branding, it was advised that it should be done at the earliest opportunity.

"The law in regards to branding is an animal has to be branded if it's being sold, and it's over 100 kilos," Det Sgt Jackson said.

"A lot of people wouldn't brand their weaners until getting prepared for sale, but it should be done in regards to responsibilities."

When asked about the legalities of encountering one of these animals on the roads, Det Sgt Jackson said it could be a complex issue.

"It's hard to prove whether a beast is wild, or if its been spooked, or chased by a dog over a fence," he said.

"It is an unlucky occurrence, but as the driver, they should directly report to the police and we'll make the appropriate inquiries to establish the owner of the animal."

The cow involved in the collision with Kye Cooper’s vehicle on Maryborough Biggenden Rd. Picture: Contributed.
The cow involved in the collision with Kye Cooper’s vehicle on Maryborough Biggenden Rd. Picture: Contributed.

If these stray cows become common occurrences in certain areas, Det Sgt Jackson encouraged landholders to report it to their local council's animal management officer.

"The situation would be a little different if the animals were being driven along the road as a mob of cattle under the control of someone else and a car drove into one," he said.

"That's a breach of permit conditions they have to abide by."

Fences and major road arterials are a must for landholders, and Det Sgt Jackson recalled a case in Roma where one gentleman refused to fix his fences.

"The council took action on the issue, and fixed all the fences, at his expense," he said.

An animal management officer from the North Burnett encourages the community to report stock on roads to the council as soon as they see it.

"If it's been reported we can go out, take photos, get the cows off the road and write a report on what has happened," they said.

"If they're repeat offenders, then we'll send them a letter saying that further action will be taken if things go further."

In the past cattle have been impounded to stem the issue of loose beasts on highways, with some landholders required to pay a fee.

If motorists are in an accident involving a cow, they're encouraged to report the incident as a car crash as soon as possible.

"That's the biggest thing they can do if they hit an animal, in order to for them to cover the costs."


Refueling to help our fire effected wildlife

premium_icon Refueling to help our fire effected wildlife

On Saturday February 29, Lowes Petroleum Service will donate one cent from every...

Not picnic weather, Bureau of Meteorology confirms wet week

premium_icon Not picnic weather, Bureau of Meteorology confirms wet week

The Bureau of Meteorology confirms more rain for Dalby

How to become more tech savvy

premium_icon How to become more tech savvy

Free workshops offered to improve digital skills.