POLICE STATION SLEEP OVER: A driver driver spent the night in the Chinchilla watch-house after hurling abuse at police calling them ‘f—king dogs, and c—ts’. Pic: Supplied
POLICE STATION SLEEP OVER: A driver driver spent the night in the Chinchilla watch-house after hurling abuse at police calling them ‘f—king dogs, and c—ts’. Pic: Supplied

Drunk driver spends night in cell after abusing police

IN A fit of alcohol-induced rage after an argument with her birth mother, Wendy May Parker took her anger out on police, hurling abuse and obscenities at them and threatening to spitting in their faces.

The woman travelled to Chinchilla from New South Wales to collect her father’s ashes, but tried to drink her problems away when her mother refused to hand them over, Chinchilla Magistrates Court heard.

Police prosecutor senior constable Jodie Tahana said on June 15 at 9pm Chinchilla police had been tasked to patrol for a silver Mercedes-Benz as the driver had shown up heavily intoxicated to an address on Barber St.

“They located the vehicle parked askew … on Zeller St,” snr const Tahana said.

“The defendant made admissions to driving … a check of the vehicle showed large amounts possessions on all seats except the drivers seat.

“The defendant refused to provide a specimen of breath.

“She commenced verbally abusing police calling them f—king dogs, c—ts, and threatening to spit in their face.”

Snr const Tahana said police noticed multiple houses along the street turn their lights on, disturbed by Parker’s commotion.

“She was subsequently arrested and taken to Chinchilla Police Station where her behaviour escalated,” she said.

The court heard Parker began punching the panel between herself and police, and when police tried to restrain her she kept throwing fists towards officers.

“The defendant did supply a specimen of breath and it returned a reading of 0.206,” snr const Tahana said.

“(Parker) was placed in a holding cell for her own safety given her intoxicated state.”

Defence lawyer Michael Corbin said the 37-year-old and mother of four had travelled to Chinchilla from NSW to obtain her fathers ashes from her mother.

“There have been a number of ongoing issues with her mother,” Mr Corbin said.

“Her father passed in 2015, and she was only recently given permission to come and collect his ashes … but her mother again caused issues and unfortunately my client chose to drink as a way of dealing with a number of issues.”

Mr Corbin told the court Parker’s mother had given her up when she was six weeks old and taken in informally by ‘friends of the family’, where she had a distressing childhood she is yet to come to terms with.

Despite her upbringing, Mr Corbin said Parker has a history of work in manufacturing and processing – although she is now in the process of completing a certificate three in disability services.

Magistrate Tracy Mossop said Parker acted appallingly.

“I’m pleased to hear you are embarrassed about it because quite frankly it is despicable what police and the public had to be subjected to,” she said.

Parker pleading guilty to three charges; obstructing a police officer, drink driving, and public nuisance.

For obstructing police, and being a public nuisance Parker was charged $500, and a conviction was not recorded.

For driving under the influence of alcohol Parker was fined $900 and disqualified from driving for nine months.

A conviction was not recorded for the UIL as Parker had no previous history of the nature.


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