PARTNERS: Western Downs Regional Council mayor Paul McVeigh talks local procurement with Dalby's Brazier Trailers managing director Greg Rayner and previous owner and current landlord Allan Brazier.
PARTNERS: Western Downs Regional Council mayor Paul McVeigh talks local procurement with Dalby's Brazier Trailers managing director Greg Rayner and previous owner and current landlord Allan Brazier. WDRC

Focus on local business

THE Western Downs Regional Council is open for business with local companies.

That was the key message at the council's Regional Procurement Roadshow held in Dalby, Chinchilla and Miles this week.

The council detailed the work it had coming up in the next 12 months, as potential contractors in the audience took note of the impending opportunities.

Council CEO Ross Musgrove said in his speech the council would work wherever possible with a local company over bringing someone in externally, but explained sometimes the council's hands could be tied due to the size of the project or the equipment it required.

Council reported a $3.3million increase in total contracts and tenders handed to regional, which was positive news according to Mayor Paul McVeigh.

"That's really good news for local business and it puts our money where our mouth is in terms of buying local,” Cr McVeigh said.

"We are committed to buying local and hiring local wherever we can and the roadshow takes those business opportunities right to our local suppliers and contractors across the Western Downs.”

One business who has recently benefited from council's local push is Brazier Trailers.

The company was recently contracted to build a new side tipper trailer for the council.

"It's great because it keeps the money in town and it's a win-win for everybody,” managing director Greg Rayner said.

"It helps the local shops and other locals' livelihoods when money goes to a local business, because we spend that money locally it keeps the town going.

"I would encourage other businesses to look into options with council.”

Mr Rayner said the benefit of completing work in their own town was unifying for the local community.

"The benefit is that you're working together better as a town, there's more flow and better working relationships,” he said.

"Delivering a local project makes it easier for customer service and that face to face interaction is important.”

Council's chief procurement officer JP Delofski said the council had made it a top priority to contract out locally, and it was paying off.

"It's always been an important focus of council but we wanted to focus on initiatives that could enact that vision,” Mr Delofski said.

"We live here and work here along with everyone else in the community, and if you don't support your local businesses it means less opportunity for people.

"We made a conscious effort to get the officers who do the procurement in the room (at the roadshow), because business is about relationships.”


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