The mystery behind shiny metallic monoliths that appeared and then disappeared in the US desert may be solved.
The mystery behind shiny metallic monoliths that appeared and then disappeared in the US desert may be solved.

Mystery monolith frenzy solved

The monolith mystery seems to be "solved" as a group of stunt artists are taking responsibility and claim to sell them for $60,596 each.

Over the last 24 hours, the artists, who go by the name The Most Famous Artist, have been posting up photos and clues on their Instagram account that detail the making of the monoliths.

The group, who are based in Santa Fe, New Mexico, first posted up photos of the monoliths, one from the Utah site and the other apparently in transit on a dolly near a warehouse.

The stunt artists posted a third photo of the California monolith on their website.

When asked by their followers on Instagram "was it you?," the account replied "if by you you mean us, yes."

RELATED: Mystery pillar in Utah desert becomes mass tourist attraction

 

The stunt artist Instagram post. Picture: Instagram
The stunt artist Instagram post. Picture: Instagram

The founder, Matty Mo, was interview by Mashable, however he would not give the a straight answer, noting that he was "not able to say much because of legalities of the original installation."

"I can say we are well known for stunts of this nature and at this time we are offering authentic art objects through monoliths-as-a-service," Mo said.

"I cannot issue additional images at this time but I can promise more on this in the coming days and weeks.

"What better way to end this f***d up year than let the world briefly think aliens made contact only to be disappointed that it's just The Most Famous Artist playing tricks again," he added.

The Most Famous Artist are selling the 10-foot-tall "authentic alien" monolith for $60,596 on it's website, which they are calling "monoliths as a service".

The two latest posts on their Instagram page depict "concept art" the artists claim are from August 2020.

There is also a video showing a three-dimensional virtual rendering of the structure.

The mystery of the monoliths has gripped the internet, with people alternatively suspecting aliens, or a self-promotional stunt from a brand.

Exasperated folks - who've been trying to figure out how and where these giant artworks came from - are desperate for a concrete answer.

The monolith frenzy began on November 18, after wildlife resource officers stumbled upon a 12-foot tall metal monolith in the middle of the Utah desert.

The strange encounter occurred when a Utah Department of Public Safety helicopter was assisting the Utah Division of Wildlife Resource officers, when they came across the giant metal monolith in the middle of the midst of barren land.

The strange steel structure mysteriously vanished on November 27, just nine days after it was first sighted.

Since then three other steel monoliths have been spotted across the globe in Romania, California, and most recently Pennsylvania and Texas.

The same day the Utah structure disappeared, Romanian news outlet Ziar Piatra Neamt reported another monolith appeared atop Batcas Doamnei Hill in the northeastern city of Piatra Neamt.

However, unlike the Utah monolith, the Romanian pillar was covered in interconnected circles, and only lasted four days before it too mysteriously disappeared on December 1.

RELATED: Mystery monolith suddenly disappears

 

 

On Wednesday, a third monolith appeared in California.

Locals spotted the latest eerie monolith in San Luis Obispo County on Wednesday morning on top of Pine Mountain in Atascadero.

Contrary to the monoliths in Utah and Romania, a gang wearing military fatigues and MAGA merchandise filmed themselves tearing down the steel monolith hours after it appeared in California.

The four vandals can be heard chanting "Christ is king" and "America first" as they pull down the "alien" structure and replace it with a wooden cross.

The bizarre trend continued on Thursday, when a forth monolith was spotted in Texas, near the San Antonio International Airport.

According to Ksat News, the steel monolith first appeared Thursday night, and by Friday morning folks flocked to the site to get a glimpse of the structure.

 

This article originally appeared on the Sun and was reproduced here with permission

Originally published as Mystery monolith frenzy solved

The Most Famous Artist are selling monoliths for $65,596 (USD$45,000) on their website. Picture: Supplied
The Most Famous Artist are selling monoliths for $65,596 (USD$45,000) on their website. Picture: Supplied

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