Dalby RSL president Graham Coles commences the wreath laying ceremony at ANZAC Park.Photo Lauren Gallagher / Dalby Herald
Dalby RSL president Graham Coles commences the wreath laying ceremony at ANZAC Park.Photo Lauren Gallagher / Dalby Herald

Remembering our fallen Anzacs

“When you go home, tell them of us and say for our tomorrow we gave our today.”

A quote found inscribed on a war grave became an anthem of appreciation for Garth Brownsdon growing up, perfectly recited by his mother.

With a rich history of national service in his family including two great uncles in the First World War and his father, aunt and uncle in the Second World War, Mr Brownsdon has a deep respect for Australia’s servicemen and women.

On his pilgrimage overseas to visit war cemeteries and memorials, that respect has only deepened.

“It was very emotional, it rammed it home to me why they went to war, to keep Australia what it is and we’re bound in duty to keep it that way,” he said.

It’s for this reason that November 11 is so important for Mr Brownsdon and for war veterans everywhere, to remember the sacrifice of our fallen soldiers.

On Monday, Dalby residents will bow their heads on the eleventh hour to remember the servicemen and women who gave their lives fighting for our freedom.

A Remembrance Day service will be held in Anzac Park from 10.30am on Monday.

President of the Dalby RSL sub-branch Graham Coles said the local service will remember 62 servicemen from World War I, 64 from World War II and one each from Vietnam and Korea.

“It’s mainly for the remembrance of the soldiers who served and who were killed from Dalby.”

This year marks the 101st anniversary of the ceasefire which ended World War 1.

As a veteran of the Vietnam War, the day holds special importance to Mr Coles.

“Being an ex-serviceman it’s about remembering the mates we’ve lost over the time,” he said.

Mr Coles said it is crucial to continue to remember our servicemen and women and teach the next generation what they gave for the life we have in Australia today.

“A moment of silence on Remembrance Day has been an Australian tradition since 1918 … in Dalby the fire brigade used to let their siren off at 11am,” he said.

“The younger generation has to learn to carry on the tradition because there’s going to be a time when we won’t be able to lead it.”

Mr Coles said it was great to see children attend the service.

“When they come some of the kids will wear their grandfather’s medals … it’s really great to see,” he said.


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