Optus has installed generators on the Fraser Coast to boost phone reception during a disaster
Optus has installed generators on the Fraser Coast to boost phone reception during a disaster

Telco rolls out new weapon in regional reception battle

AS THE battle for the best regional reception continues on the Coast, Optus has revealed its plan to keep customers connected in the event of a natural disaster.

The telco has revealed 33 generators have been rolled out in five regional patches - the Fraser Coast, Townsville, Cairns, Mackay and Rockhampton.

It's promised this will "increase reliability of its regional network at key sites in the area".

Optus Territory General Manager for Wide Bay Mungo O'Brien said the company knew network continuity during natural disasters was critical.

"While the industry works on a range of solutions with energy providers and emergency services this boost of new generators is crucial to ensure our sites are best supported to handle any unfavourable weather conditions and deliver a resilient network," Mr O'Brien said.

Optus has invested more than $6 billion into its network since 2015 and built 8000 mobile sites Australia wide in an effort to be a real competitor in regional communities.

"Our network is stronger than ever before in regional Australia and by deploying generators at key sites in the Fraser Coast region, we look forward to putting the best possible measures in place to maintain network service continuity," Mr O'Brien said.


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