HERALD BEGINNINGS: An early view of Dalby.
HERALD BEGINNINGS: An early view of Dalby. Contributed

The Herald's humble beginnings

IN THESE present times of mass media we can reflect on those pioneering days when citizens of Dalby didn't have radio or television, computers or smartphones.

They did have one source of news, for those who were educated to read, and that was the newspaper.

Dalby produced a newspaper from 1865 and that kept the people up to date with local and some world news.

William Chambers claimed he was reading the Dalby Herald for half a century and that claim was made nearly a hundred years ago.

Being a small town, he also he knew the proprietors, editors, printers and the dramas of an early newspaper.

The Dalby Herald was first established by Jordan and Robinson and was brought out as a weekly on Saturday.

Later in the century it became a bi-weekly.

Chambers remembers their location in early times.

"The Herald office was an old broken down building at the rear of the site of the School of Arts, but formerly occupied as an old shearing shed.”

"Our old newspaper, the Dalby Herald held its own through the years and against all of the many comers. Amongst others we had the Bulletin and then the Record which did not last long and then the Leader. The old Herald is going as strong as ever.”

Editor Michael Jordan was well liked and married a Miss Kenny and it has been said he was much older than her. Her brother began working for the Herald but being a cripple had some difficulty getting around.

Nevertheless he did all the writing for the paper and did it well. He sang in the church choir and had an excellent bass voice.

He had a large Newfoundland dog that was always by his side. They were a well-known sight on the streets of Dalby.

Three young men worked in the newspaper's office. John Dexter the town clerk's son, Hugh Sweeny son of a well-known carrier and Fred Eastaughffe.

Fred was well educated at Steele School and under private tutors and afterwards learned the printing business and journalistic profession. In the Herald he worked his way up to hold the position as manager and partner.

He always took an interest in public affairs and was an alderman in the Town Council for over four years. In 1872 he married a Miss O'Brien and the couple had five sons.

The Dalby Herald has now survived for 154 years which must be a record for a small country town. Its office has been established in many locations around the town and must have employed countless staff in that time.


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