MORE CHARGES: Greyhound trainer Tom Noble has appeared in court accused of intimidating a witness.
MORE CHARGES: Greyhound trainer Tom Noble has appeared in court accused of intimidating a witness. Rob Williams

Trainer charged with intimidating a witness

A LOCKYER Valley greyhound trainer caught up in the live baiting scandal has been accused of intimidating a witness.

Churchable man Tom Noble was the first casualty of a state-wide police operation to target animal cruelty in greyhound racing.

Since then, 13 people in Queensland have been arrested on 51 charges in relation to the scandal.

Noble's case had been adjourned until July 1 for a committal hearing alongside a several other accused trainers.

However, the 68-year-old found himself back in court earlier than expected after he was accused of trying to coerce a witness into changing her statement.

The charge stemmed from an alleged phone conservation between Noble and Ipswich greyhound owner and breeder, Julie Edmondson.

It was believed Noble phoned Edmondson after learning she had also been charged with animal cruelty offences as well.

Edmondson had appeared at Ipswich Magistrates Court on Wednesday and also had the matter adjourned for July 1.

During the phone call, it was alleged Noble instructed Edmondson to visit his solicitor and tell him she was under duress and wanted to change her statement.

Police prosecutor Sergeant Brad Dick said intimidating a witness to change their story was "a serious matter" and objected to granting Noble bail.

"Clearly this was an attempt to pervert the course of justice," he said.

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Sgt Dick said Noble had been released on bail when he faced court for seven charges of serious animal cruelty on March 10.

"Bail was not opposed on that occasion due to Noble's mature age and lack of criminal history," Sgt Dick said.

"Those circumstances have now changed, he has shown he is an unacceptable risk."

Defence lawyer Dylan Hans said Noble had known Edmondson for decades through their involvement in greyhound racing.

Mr Hans said Noble had phoned the 63-year-old with the intention to comfort her.

He said his client only suggested Edmondson use his lawyer because it would save her in legal costs.

Mr Hans said the prosecution's case was "weak" because there was no proof as to what was said during the phone conversation.

Magistrate Barry Cosgrove said he was concerned about Noble's risk of reoffending.

Mr Cosgrove said if Noble hoped to be given bail, it would need to come with a range of conditions, including who he would be allowed to speak to.

In the meantime, Noble's bail was refused and the matter was adjourned until July 1.


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