Dog walker finds snake going for a slithery street stroll

IT was meant to be a late-night stroll with her dog around Parramatta Park, but Gabbie Thomasz and Ollie, a rescue bull-mastiff-labrador, were stopped in their tracks when they saw a 3-4 metre snake slithering its way across Upward Street on Tuesday.

Ms Thomasz said that it was not the first time she had seen that snake in the area.

"But I was still in awe, it's a magnificent creature doing its thing last night," Ms Thomasz said.

"It was the same one we saw eating a big, fat rat under our house in April.

"I was worried because it was in the middle of the road."

Asked about how Ollie reacted, Ms Thomasz said he didn't care.

"He just wanted to go for a walk," she said.

"Ollie and I left after taking a photo and when we came back, it was gone."

Parramatta Park resident Gabbie Thomasz captured a 3–4 metre python making its way across Upward Street. PICTURE: Supplied
Parramatta Park resident Gabbie Thomasz captured a 3–4 metre python making its way across Upward Street. PICTURE: Supplied

Ms Thomasz then sent the photo to her husband, former councillor Richie Bates.

"I was watching TV when she sent the photo and we thought it was the same that's come near our house previously," Mr Bates said.

"We've seen it in the shed and pool, as well as under and in our ceiling catching rats."

Cairns Snake Removals' operator David Walton said the snake was an amethystine python, also known as the scrub python, which isn't considered dangerous to humans as it is not venomous.

Gabbie Thomasz captured a python eating a “big, fat” rat under her Parramatta Park house in April.
Gabbie Thomasz captured a python eating a “big, fat” rat under her Parramatta Park house in April.

"It's uncommon to the regular resident in that area, but it's quite common to snake catchers.

"Often you'd see one that's tennis-ball thick if they're around the three-metre mark."

The 19-year snake-catching veteran said the area, which includes Lily Creek, "seems to produce its fair share of pythons" and was "a corridor for wildlife in general".

"There's still a lot of habitat and undisturbed area there," he said.

"But those pythons are quite domesticated animals.

"They're right in the middle of suburban Cairns and have adapted quite easily.

"If a python exhausts a particular house of vermin, there are fresh pickings next door."

Mr Walton advises residents to avoid removing and interfering with snakes themselves as it requires someone with a permit to do so.

Originally published as WATCH: Python eats rat under inner-city Cairns home


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